CompTIA Linux+ Powered by LPI

Linux+ Certification CompTIA Linux+ Powered by LPI is a high-stakes, vendor-neutral certification that validates the fundamental knowledge and skills required of junior Linux administrators.

Two exams are necessary to be certified: LX0-101 and LX0-102.  LX0-101 covers system architecture; Linux Installation and package management; GNU and Unix commands; devices, Linux filesystems, and filesystem hierarchy standard. LX0-102 covers shells, scripting and data management; user interfaces and desktops; administrative tasks; essential system services; networking fundamentals; security. 


A new benefit for CompTIA Linux+ Powered by LPI candidates is that they may choose, at the time they take the exams, to have their exam record forwarded to the Linux Professional Institute. Certification in CompTIA Linux+ Powered by LPI, attained by passing CompTIA exams LX0-101 and LX0-102, enables candidates to become certified in LPIC-1 as well, enabling further participation in the LPI program if the candidate chooses. Please note that CompTIA maintains candidate-confidential records for all exam takers, for their own access and use for employment or educational purposes. Any choice to forward an exam record to LPI is made only by the candidate.

Candidate job roles include junior Linux administrator, junior network administrator, systems administrator, Linux database administrator and web administrator. Organizations where Linux+ Powered by LPI is regularly used include Dell, Boeing, IBM, Google, the U.S. Dept. of Defense and major government contractors.

Test Details
Required exams Two, LX0-101 and LX0-102
Number of questions 60 for each exam
Length of test 90 minutes each
Passing score 500 
(on a scale of 200-800)
Languages English, German, Portuguese, Traditional Chinese (Taiwan), Spanish
Recommended experience CompTIA A+, CompTIA Network+ and at least 12 months of Linux administration experience
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Certifications like CompTIA A+ are a very good way of ensuring everyone reaches a common level of understanding. It allows us to set a course benchmark from which everyone can proceed with their learning.
Rob Warrender
Principal Lecturer, University of Sunderland

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